Development of induction motors drives with real time PWM control and dynamic modeling of drive performance with graphical user interface

G. Chowdhury, M. Giesselmann

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

A prototype motor drive controller incorporating a digital signal processor in combination with a special “PWM co-processor” was build and tested. The “PWM co-processor” (HANNING TCllOG17AP) is capable of operating in a quasi standalone mode or in close contact with the controlling microprocessor for real time PWM generation and field oriented (vector) control. The digital signal processor @SP) was a TI TMS-320C26 model that was programmed through a PC computer. A combination of the International Rectifier IR-2130 chip with six IGBTs provided the inverter. Six opto-isolators are used to provide total electrical isolation between the power electronic stage and the controller. A description of the design is given, and experimental results obtained on the prototype motor drive are shown. This design involved open-loop, V-f control. Closed loop control and machine performance was modeled using the evaluation version of Micro Sim’s Design Center 6.0 software package. This software provided a graphical user interface for drive modeling. Users can go down several levels deep into the hierarchical model structure just by double-clicking on any symbol. This way model details can be explored and edited if necessary. A detailed example of an induction motor model with a general reference frame controlled by a field oriented controller (vector drive) is shown.

Original languageEnglish
Pages190-195
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
EventIntersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, 1994 - Monterey, United States
Duration: Aug 7 1994Aug 12 1994

Conference

ConferenceIntersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, 1994
CountryUnited States
CityMonterey
Period08/7/9408/12/94

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Development of induction motors drives with real time PWM control and dynamic modeling of drive performance with graphical user interface'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this