Destruction of chemical and biological warfare agents using a steam-plasma

L. Farrar, D. Haack, S. McGrath, J. Dickens, E. O’Hair, J. Fralick

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

A thermal plasma that uses steam as the plasmaforming gas is being developed for the destruction of chemical and biological warfare agents. The process forms an ionized steam plume that includes hydroxyl radicals (OH), atomic oxygen and intense ultraviolet (UV) radiation. These highly oxidative gases and radiation, combined with the plasma thermal energy, form an effective means for the destruction of hazardous chemical and biological warfare agents. This approach was demonstrated to destroy surrogate agents at a rate that makes it suitable for application on large area surfaces, such as runways, staging areas and roads. Attributes and limitations for the destruction of warfare agents have been identified.

Original languageEnglish
StatePublished - 1999
Event30th Plasmadynamic and Lasers Conference, 1999 - Norfolk, United States
Duration: Jun 28 1999Jul 1 1999

Conference

Conference30th Plasmadynamic and Lasers Conference, 1999
CountryUnited States
CityNorfolk
Period06/28/9907/1/99

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    Farrar, L., Haack, D., McGrath, S., Dickens, J., O’Hair, E., & Fralick, J. (1999). Destruction of chemical and biological warfare agents using a steam-plasma. Paper presented at 30th Plasmadynamic and Lasers Conference, 1999, Norfolk, United States.