Coursework, Instrument Exposure, and Perceived Competence in Psychological Assessment: A National Survey of Practices and Beliefs of Health Service Psychology Trainees

Paul B. Ingram, Adam T. Schmidt, Becca K. Bergquist, Joseph M. Currin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Assessment is critical to health service psychology and represents a core area of coverage during doctoral training. Despite this, training practices in assessment are understudied. Accordingly, this study utilized a national sampling of students (n = 534) enrolled in an American Psychological Association-accredited health service psychology doctoral program with substantive training in clinical or counseling psychology. We asked trainees to rate their competency for instruments in which they had training. We examined trends in training experiences, including both theory-based education and applied clinical opportunities, and explored differences in instrument training trends across program type (PhD/PsyD) and program discipline (clinical/ counseling). Results of this study suggest a general convergence with professional practice trends in terms of instrument coverage, less clinical training, and exposure compared with didactic methods and generally small differences across program type and discipline in perceived competence and instrument exposure. Implications for training and education in psychological assessment are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTraining and Education in Professional Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Competency
  • Education
  • Psychological assessment
  • Training

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