Counter-stereotyped protagonists and stereotyped supporting casts: Identification with black characters and symbolic racism

Joshua A. Dunn, Bryan McLaughlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While exposure to stereotyped minority characters reinforces prejudice, when viewers identify with counter-stereotyped characters prejudice tends to decrease. This study examines the juxtaposition of identifying with either a counter-stereotyped Black protagonist or a stereotyped supporting cast. Participants read a prompt (group vs. individual salience), watched an episode of Luke Cage, then reported their identification with the Black protagonist (Cage) and the social group (the Black community of Harlem). Findings suggest that individual identification with a counter-stereotype reduces symbolic racism, while social identification with a stereotyped group does not.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-319
Number of pages11
JournalCommunication Research Reports
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 8 2019

Keywords

  • Counter-Stereotypes
  • Identification
  • Mediated Intergroup Contact
  • Stereotypes
  • Symbolic Racism

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