Contributing factors to reporting intimate partner violence as a clinical concern

Lara Hoss, Kathryn Wagner, Emma Allen, Douglas Smith, Kristy Soloski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a prevalent problem in clinical populations. However, many couples experiencing IPV do not report it to their therapists, and many therapists do not systematically screen IPV. This creates a dangerous situation where IPV is going unidentified, placing couples at risk for future violence and limiting the effectiveness of therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify variables that differentiate couples who report IPV as a clinical concern during the intake session versus those who do not. Using a clinical sample, ANOVAs, chi-square, and multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine differences between participants among the chosen variables and to determine which participants may be more likely to report IPV as a clinical concern. Results indicated that participants who were more distressed were more likely to report IPV as a clinical concern. The study ends with discussing implications for systematic screening and future dir
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Marital and Family Therapy
StatePublished - Oct 2023

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