Contrasting CyberShake simulations and conventional hazard analysis to assess collapse risk of tall buildings in the Los Angeles basin

N. Bijelić, T. Lin, G. G. Deierlein

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Limited data on strong earthquakes and their effect on structures poses one of the main challenges of making reliable risk assessments of tall buildings. For instance, while the collapse safety of tall buildings is likely controlled by large magnitude earthquakes with long durations and low-frequency content, there are few available recorded ground motions to evaluate these issues. The influence of geologic basins on amplifying ground motion effects raises additional questions. Absent recorded motions from past large magnitude earthquakes, physics-based ground motion simulations provide an attractive alternative. This paper examines collapse performance of an archetype tall building at sites in the Los Angeles basin utilizing ground motions simulated as part of the Southern California Earthquake Center's CyberShake project. The collapse risks of an archetype 20-story tall building are obtained using large datasets (~500,000 ground motions per site) of unscaled, site-specific simulated seismograms. Collapse risk from direct analysis of simulated motions is contrasted with risk estimates obtained using "conventional" approaches relying on recorded motions coupled with probabilistic seismic hazard assessments from the U.S. Geological Survey. Further, deaggregation of collapse risk is used to identify the relative contributions of causal earthquakes. Opportunities for continued research, development, and application of ground motion simulations to engineering applications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication11th National Conference on Earthquake Engineering 2018, NCEE 2018
Subtitle of host publicationIntegrating Science, Engineering, and Policy
PublisherEarthquake Engineering Research Institute
Pages4810-4818
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9781510873254
StatePublished - 2018
Event11th National Conference on Earthquake Engineering 2018: Integrating Science, Engineering, and Policy, NCEE 2018 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Jun 25 2018Jun 29 2018

Publication series

Name11th National Conference on Earthquake Engineering 2018, NCEE 2018: Integrating Science, Engineering, and Policy
Volume8

Conference

Conference11th National Conference on Earthquake Engineering 2018: Integrating Science, Engineering, and Policy, NCEE 2018
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period06/25/1806/29/18

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