Comparing the reliability of voluntary and evoked muscle actions

Nathaniel D.M. Jenkins, Ty B. Palmer, Joel T. Cramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Summary: Purpose: The purpose of this exploratory study was to quantify the test-retest reliability, intertrial variability and correlations between variables calculated during voluntary and evoked muscle actions. Methods: During three separate trials of isometric leg extension muscle actions with 14 men [mean age (±SD) = 21·9 (±3·2) years; height = 179·2 (±8·0) cm; mass = 77·7 (±10·9) kg], peak torque (PTV), time to peak torque (TPTV), rate of torque development (RTDV), time to peak rate of torque development (TRTDV), electromechanical delay (EMDV) and EMG amplitude (EMGRMS) were quantified for voluntary muscle actions. Peak twitch torque (PTE), time to peak twitch torque (TPTE), rate of torque development (RTDE), time to peak rate of torque development (TRTDE), electromechanical delay (EMDE), peak-to-peak M-wave (Mp-p) and M-wave area (Marea) were calculated for evoked twitches. All electromyographic measurements were recorded over the vastus lateralis. Results: Voluntary intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were 0·84-0·96, except for TRTDV (0·30) and EMDV (0·74). Evoked ICC were 0·80-0·95, except for EMDE (0·52). Relative standard errors of measurement for TPT and TRTD were greater for voluntary than evoked, whereas the value for PTE was greater than PTV. There were low to moderate correlations (r = -0·41-0·51) between common voluntary and evoked variables. Conclusions: Evoked variables showed lower intertrial variability than voluntary. Overall, voluntary and evoked muscle actions provide unique, complimentary information regarding neuromuscular function that cannot be used interchangeably.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)434-441
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

Keywords

  • Electrical stimulation
  • Isometric muscle actions
  • Minimum difference
  • Neuromuscular testing
  • Test-retest reliability
  • Variability

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