Comparing Agenda Content and Roll-call Behaviour in Regular and Lame-duck Sessions of the House of Representatives, 1879–2010

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper investigates how agenda content and floor behaviour in the US House of Representatives vary across regular and lame-duck sessions. The presence of departing members created a legislative environment marked by increased ideological and participatory shirking, resulting in higher levels of uncertainty. That uncertainty affected how members devised proposal strategies in the face of more fluid voting patterns in lame-duck sessions. The analysis of a unique data set comprised of roll-call votes on House floor motions with an identifiable sponsor from 1879 to 2010 (the 46th to 111th Congresses) uncovers significant changes in the relative frequencies of particular categories of votes, in the success rates on votes within those categories, as well as in the spatial characteristics of floor motions. These findings underscore how the move to the lame-duck session ushered in a distinct and different legislative environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)430-450
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Legislative Studies
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2014

Keywords

  • lame-duck session
  • roll-call voting
  • shirking
  • spatial model

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Comparing Agenda Content and Roll-call Behaviour in Regular and Lame-duck Sessions of the House of Representatives, 1879–2010'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this