Comparative genome analysis to identify SNPs associated with high oleic acid and elevated protein content in soybean

Krishnanand P. Kulkarni, Gunvant Patil, Babu Valliyodan, Tri D. Vuong, J. Grover Shannon, Henry T. Nguyen, Jeong Dong Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the genetic relationship between the oleic acid and protein content. The genotypes having high oleic acid and elevated protein (HOEP) content were crossed with five elite lines having normal oleic acid and average protein (NOAP) content. The selected accessions were grown at six environments in three different locations and phenotyped for protein, oil, and fatty acid components. The mean protein content of parents, HOEP, and NOAP lines was 34.6%, 38%, and 34.9%, respectively. The oleic acid concentration of parents, HOEP, and NOAP lines was 21.7%, 80.5%, and 20.8%, respectively. The HOEP plants carried both FAD2-1A (S117N) and FAD2-1B (P137R) mutant alleles contributing to the high oleic acid phenotype. Comparative genome analysis using whole-genome resequencing data identified six genes having single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) significantly associated with the traits analyzed. A single SNP in the putative gene Glyma.10G275800 was associated with the elevated protein content, and palmitic, oleic, and linoleic acids. The genes from the marker intervals of previously identified QTL did not carry SNPs associated with protein content and fatty acid composition in the lines used in this study, indicating that all the genes except Glyma.10G278000 may be the new genes associated with the respective traits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-222
Number of pages6
JournalGenome
Volume61
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Comparative genome analysis
  • Elevated protein content
  • High oleic acid
  • Soybean
  • Whole-genome resequencing

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