Comparative analysis of the factors contributing to sustainability of a food and nutrition intervention programme: Two case studies from South Africa

Wilna Hendrika Oldewage-Theron, Sara Susanna Duvenage, Abdulkadir Ali Egal, Conrad Lyford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sustainability of health interventions is a consistent and ongoing issue in Africa. Understanding key aspects of sustainable interventions provides the necessary methods for success. This research evaluates a nutrition intervention implemented in two peri-urban communities in the Free State and Gauteng province in South Africa (SA) respectively. A case study approach was employed using cross-case study analyses, including triangular data collection (empirical research through surveys of respondents; qualitative data collection through researcher journals, diaries, communications and photographs; and research team reflections). The information from these case studies is organized according to a framework from the United States (US) Office of Organizational Health (OAH) to evaluate the sustainability of intervention programmes. All eight of the OAH criteria were met in the Free State community and supported the importance of these key factors for sustainability compared to only three in the Gauteng community. The OAH framework provided a compelling rationale for the relative success of the intervention and clearly showed the Free State project was sustainable. The Gauteng project was not sustainable. Planned interventions should devote significant effort and time towards ensuring sustainability. The OAH guidelines provide key steps that the research shows is relevant to the South African context.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-57
Number of pages7
JournalEvaluation and Program Planning
Volume71
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2018

Keywords

  • Case study
  • Community
  • Nutrition program
  • South Africa
  • Sustainability

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