City sterilization and poverty management: Examining a mobility hub in the "redevelopment and enhancement" of downtown Tallahassee

Christopher McLeod, Matthew I. Horner, Matthew G. Hawzen, Mark Didonato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

People experiencing homelessness use service centers, shelters, missions, and other voluntary organizations to access material resources and social networks. Because these service hubs have a dense array of resources, people sometimes incorporate them into their daily movements around urban space, which re- sults in patterns or tendencies called mobility systems. Drawing on participant observation, document analysis, and spatial analytics via geographic infor- mation systems (GIS), we describe the mobility system organized around one homeless services center in Tallahassee, Florida. Moreover, we present a case study of how this homeless services center was moved away from downtown to an upgraded facility to show how city administrators manage homeless mobil- ity systems when they are deemed unsafe for downtown redevelopment. e case supports previous studies that found punitive and supportive strategies are used together, but adds how mobility and “network capital” can be used to eval
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-111
JournalTransfers
StatePublished - Dec 2017

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