Circuitry of self-control and its role in reducing addiction

Yi Yuan Tang, Michael I. Posner, Mary K. Rothbart, Nora D. Volkow

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

69 Scopus citations

Abstract

We discuss the idea that addictions can be treated by changing the mechanisms involved in self-control with or without regard to intention. The core clinical symptoms of addiction include an enhanced incentive for drug taking (craving), impaired self-control (impulsivity and compulsivity), negative mood, and increased stress reactivity. Symptoms related to impaired self-control involve reduced activity in control networks including anterior cingulate (ACC), adjacent prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and striatum. Behavioral training such as mindfulness meditation can increase the function of control networks and may be a promising approach for the treatment of addiction, even among those without intention to quit.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-444
Number of pages6
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

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