Charitable estate planning and subsequent wealth accumulation: Why percentage gifts may be worth more than we thought

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Educational institutions receive a disproportionately large share of their gift income from estates. Charitable estate plans often donate a share of the total estate, rather than a specific dollar amount. The value of this type of planned gift depends not only on the value of the estate at the time the plan is signed, but also on the individual's tendency to accumulate or consume wealth afterwards. An analysis of 28 111 individuals in the 1995-2006 Health and Retirement Study using ordinary least squares and individual growth modeling indicated that the rate of subsequent wealth accumulation for those who entered the study with a charitable estate plan was 50 -100 percent greater than for those who entered the study without a charitable estate plan. This finding suggests that the ultimate value of percentage-based planned gifts is greater than what would be expected using standard estate growth projections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-32
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Educational Advancement
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

Keywords

  • Charitable estates
  • bequests
  • charitable giving
  • financial planning
  • planned giving
  • wealth accumulation

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