Changes in plasma somatostatin associated with seawater adaptation and stunting of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch

Mark A. Sheridan, Carmen D. Eilertson, Theodore H. Kerstetter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Somatostatins (SSs) are a family of peptide hormones made up of different molecular forms that have been found to modulate various aspects of growth, development, and metabolism of vertebrates. In this study, coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were used to evaluate the role of SSs in seawater (SW) adaptation. In experiment 1, pre-smolt and smolt coho salmon (age = 1-1.5 years) were transferred to SW and sampled at zero, one, two, and seven days later. For both pre-smolts and smolts, plasma SS-25 concentrations rose following SW exposure and reached peak levels two days after transfer; thereafter, levels gradually declined. Interestingly, SS-25 levels were higher in pre-smolts than those in smolts, a difference that was similar to that noted for rectal [Na+] and indicating a greater state of SW readiness for the smolt group. In experiment 2, pre-smolt coho salmon were transferred to SW and sampled eight weeks later. Pre-smolt SW exposure resulted in significant growth retardation (stunting). Plasma levels of both SS-25 and SS-14 were significantly higher in stunts than those in their normal (SW smolt) counterparts. These results indicate that changes in SSs accompany SW adaptation and that SSs may be involved with stunting associated with premature SW transfer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-203
Number of pages9
JournalAquaculture
Volume168
Issue number1-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1998

Keywords

  • Seawater adaptation
  • Somatostatin
  • Stunting

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Changes in plasma somatostatin associated with seawater adaptation and stunting of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this