Capping contaminated sediments - the theoretical basis and laboratory experimental evidence for chemical containment

L. J. Thibodeaux, K. T. Valsaraj, D. D. Reible

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sub-aquatic capping has been and is being practiced. It is a potentially cost effective in-situ chemical containment, bottom restoration technology that does not enjoy a broad base of understanding and/or acceptance by the general scientific and engineering community much less the general public. Although the laboratory evidence verifies the theoretical predictions of 99.99+% containment of the chemical species, field data on containment observations at the full-scale have been too site specific and problematic. Even though there are apparently several capping successes in the field, the data base is too small and empirical to allow design confidence at another site which has somewhat different conditions. Differences in sediment quality, contaminants, bottom currents, sediment mechanical strength, cap material, biology etc. are all factors that enter into the uncertainty in design. Many theoretical aspects supporting chemical containment are well developed. Several key features have been tested and verified in the laboratory. More laboratory work is needed. A field-test protocol also needs to be developed as a means of pilot-scale testing chemical containment at a site prior to full-scale implementation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages1001-1007
Number of pages7
StatePublished - 1994
EventProceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Dredging and Dredged Material Placement. Part 2 (of 2) - Lake Buena Vista, FL, USA
Duration: Nov 13 1994Nov 16 1994

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Dredging and Dredged Material Placement. Part 2 (of 2)
CityLake Buena Vista, FL, USA
Period11/13/9411/16/94

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