Canine human scent identifications with post-blast debris collected from improvised explosive devices

Allison M. Curran, Paola A. Prada, Kenneth G. Furton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study it is demonstrated that human odor collected from items recovered at a post-blast scene can be evaluated using human scent specific canine teams to locate and identify individuals who have been in contact with the improvised explosive device (IED) components and/or the delivery vehicle. The purpose of the experiments presented here was to document human scent survivability in both peroxide-based explosions as well as simulated roadside IEDs utilizing double-blind field trials. Human odor was collected from post-blast device and vehicle components. Human scent specific canine teams were then deployed at the blast scene and in locations removed from the blast scene to validate that human odor remains in sufficient quantities for reliable canine detection and identification. Human scent specific canines have shown the ability to identify individuals who have been in contact with IEDs using post-blast debris with an average success from site response of 82.2% verifying that this technology has great potential in criminal, investigative, and military applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-108
Number of pages6
JournalForensic Science International
Volume199
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Keywords

  • Canine teams
  • Human odor
  • Improvised explosive device (IED)
  • Peroxide-based explosions
  • Post-blast debris

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