Can users judge the stair-climbing abilities of two-wheeled self-balancing robots?

Keith S. Jones, Elizabeth A. Schmidlin, Noah J. Wheeler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This experiment examined users' abilities to judge whether an autonomous robot can accomplish a given task. It was predicted that 1) participants would differentiate the action-capabilities of short and tall robots, 2) participants would base their judgments on an action-relevant scalar, and 3) participants' judgments would be accurate. All three predictions were supported. This is important because it suggests that users may be able to accurately judge whether an autonomous robot can accomplish a given task without having previously observed that robot perform that task. The ability to do so will be very important as users increasingly ask their robots to perform tasks that the robots' designers may have never considered.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Pages1326-1330
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 22 2012Oct 26 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/22/1210/26/12

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