Can Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) and hemispherical photographs predict Tropical Dry Forest Succession with liana abundance?

Arturo Sanchez, Mauricio Vega, Antonio Guzman, Carlos Campos, Sandra Duran, Nikhil D'Souza, Thomas Gianoli, Carlos Portillo Quintero, Iain Sharp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lianas, woody vines, are a key component of tropical forest because they may reduce carbon storage potential. Lianas are increasing in density and biomass in tropical forests, but it is unknown what the potential consequences of these increases are for forest dynamics. Lianas may proliferate in disturbed areas, such as regenerating forests, but little is known about the role of lianas in secondary succession. In this study, we evaluated the potential of the ground LiDAR to detect differences in the vertical structure of stands of different ages with and without lianas in tropical dry forests. Specifically, we used a terrestrial laser scanner called VEGNET to assess whether liana presence influences the vertical signature of stands of different ages, and whether successional trajectories as detected by the VEGNET could be altered by liana presence. We deployed the VEGNET ground LiDAR system in 15 secondary forests of different ages early (21 years old since land abandonment), intermedi
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)977-988
JournalBiogeosciences
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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