Can experience overcome prior knowledge's impact on Web navigation?

Keith S. Jones, J. Shawn Farris, Brian R. Johnson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Farris (2003) discovered that users had greater difficulty finding information on a Web site when their prior knowledge was inconsistent with the site's content, relative to when their knowledge was consistent with it. In addition, he found that this difficulty was persistent over trials. To explain this persistence, Farris offered a schema-based account, which instantiated inconsistency in a single manner. The present study tested a prediction that was derived from Farris' account. The results associated with navigation efficiency supported Farris' account. The results associated with the choices made by participants as they navigated the site, however, contradicted his explanation. A new account, based on production-rules rather than schemata, is offered that accounts for both sets of results because it instantiates inconsistency in more than one manner. This new account has implications for the design and redesign of Web sites.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005
Pages1424-1428
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 2005
Event49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Sep 26 2005Sep 30 2005

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period09/26/0509/30/05

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