Black collegians practicing resistance in the midst of chaos: Applying transgenerational activist knowledge to navigate predominantly White institutions

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Abstract

This study examines how 12 Black student leaders apply transgenerational knowledge to pursue social change while attending a predominantly White institution. Findings indicated participants’ used Black cultural beliefs as a source of pride concerning what it means to be Black and to create positive change on campus through engaging in activism. By applying parental and elder transgenerational knowledge participants were able to preserve and protect the communal interest of Black students. Participants engaged in face-to-face and digital modes of protest, resistance and communication by using technology to conduct activism. The emergent themes were: Preserving “My” Black; and Digital Underground. These findings provide insight into how Black student leadership identities are positively influenced by racial socialization.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-282
JournalJournal of Negro Education
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 30 2017

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