Biomass production for bioenergy using recycled wastewater in a natural waste treatment system

Clifford B. Fedler, Runbin Duan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bioenergy production from biomass is proposed as a method to solve part of the nation's energy problem. However, biomass and bioenergy production is questioned as an environment-friendly approach due to the potential increase of water pollution and the potential decrease of available water resource. A conceptual model of an integrated natural waste treatment system that produces biogas and biomass for bioenergy, treat waste and wastewater, conserve fresh water, and decrease the potential water pollution is presented. The potential biomass production from water hyacinth, duckweed, cattail, and knotgrass was investigated using recycling wastewater from an integrated natural waste treatment system from 2005 to 2008. Although the biomass production from recycling wastewater was not controlled for maximum production, this research identified the large potential impact that could be made if these systems were implemented. The overall average water hyacinth growth rate was high to 0.297 kg wet wt./m2/day during a research period of over 500 days, including both the active and non-active growing seasons. The average daily growth rates of duckweed, cattail, and knotgrass were 0.099-0.127, 0.015, and 0.018 kg wet wt./m2, respectively. This research illustrated that water hyacinth was a more promising aquatic plant biomass for bioenergy production when wastewater effluent was recycled as water and nutrient sources from an integrated natural waste treatment system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)793-800
Number of pages8
JournalResources, Conservation and Recycling
Volume55
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Keywords

  • Bioenergy
  • Bioremediation
  • Renewable energy
  • Water sustainability

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