Bayesian nonparametric mixed-effects joint model for longitudinal-competing risks data analysis in presence of multiple data features

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Abstract

Recently, the joint analysis of longitudinal and survival data has been an active research area. Most joint models focus on survival data with only one type of failure. The research on joint modeling of longitudinal and competing risks survival data is sparse. Even so, many joint models for this type of data assume parametric function forms for both longitudinal and survival sub-models, thus limits their use. Further, the common data features that are usually observed in practice, such as asymmetric distribution and missingness in response, measurement errors in covariate, need to be taken into account for reliable parameter estimation. The statistical inference is complicated when all these factors are considered simultaneously. In the article, driven by a motivating example, we assume nonparametric function forms for the varying coefficients in both longitudinal and competing risks survival sub-models. We propose a Bayesian nonparametric mixed-effects joint model for the analysis of longitudinal-competing risks data with asymmetry, missingness, and measurement errors. Simulation studies are conducted to assess the performance of the proposed method. We apply the proposed method to an AIDS dataset and compare a few candidate models under various settings. Some interesting results are reported.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2407-2423
Number of pages17
JournalStatistical Methods in Medical Research
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Keywords

  • AIDS study
  • Bayesian inference
  • competing risk
  • detection limit
  • longitudinal data
  • measurement error
  • mixed-effects models
  • skew distribution
  • survival data
  • varying-coefficient hazard models

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