Are children living on dead-end streets more active? Near-home street patterns and school-going children's time spent outdoors in Dhaka, Bangladesh

Muntazar Monsur, Mohaimen Mansur, Mohammed Zakiul Islam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate relationships between near-home street patterns and children's time spent outdoors (TSO). Participants were 60 (n = 60) school-age Dhaka children, 7–11 years old (16 girls and 44 boys) selected by a two-phase cluster sampling method. Data were collected from September 2010 to June 2011 by visiting each of 60 children's homes. Children's mean TSOs (in minutes) were reported by parents' face-to-face interviews, and near-home street pattern data were collected by systematic direct observations. The researchers also collected data on seven socio-demographic variables and three neighborhood built-environment variables. A backward selection based multiple linear regression was used to examine association between children's TSO and near-home street patterns. Results (adjusted R2 = 0.66 for weekdays and 0.68 for weekend) suggested that children's TSO were significantly associated with near-home street type: dead-end instead of through streets (28 min on weekdays, p < 0.01 and 66 min on weekend, p < 0.01). The width of the street, level of its branching and availability of an open space or playground near the house are also positively associated with TSO. Near-home street features significantly contribute to TSO in school-going children of Dhaka.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S73-S80
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume103
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Child
  • Environmental impact
  • Motor activity

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