Applying the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats/challenges (SWOT) framework to identify group interactions during a project-based learning activity

Patricia G. Patrick, William J. Bryan, Shirley Matteson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Project-based learning (PBL) instructional methods attempt to make connections between students and their ability to solve real problems. We framed our qualitative study within sociocultural theory and used the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) model to define the positive and negative factors occurring during a PBL activity. We followed 22 rural community college chemistry students during a garden-based PBL activity and collected data through discussions, observations, open-ended exam questions, semi-structured interviews, and reflective journals. Our goal was to identify the social influences on groups in real time, meaning defining group interactions as they were occurring, and organize the findings within a SWOT framework. We discovered four strengths (discussions, groups, instructor support, and knowledge/experience), six weaknesses (absences, collaboration, communication, dominant member, motivation, and procrastination), four opportunities (Canvas and Goo
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-13
JournalJournal of College Science Teaching
StatePublished - Nov 1 2020

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