Anthropogenic-induced changes in the 21st Century summertime hydroclimatology of the Northeastern U.S.

Bruce Anderson, Katharine Hayhoe, X Liang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Potential changes in summertime hydroclimatology over the northeastern (NE) region of the USA induced by increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations are investigated using a state-of-the-art regional climate modeling system. Results for a higher emissions scenario illustrate changes that may occur if dependence on fossil fuels continues over the coming century. Summertime precipitation is projected to decrease across much of the central NE, but increase over the southernmost and northernmost portions of the domain. Evaporation is expected to increase across the entire domain. The balance between these two results in a decrease in soil moisture content across most of the domain (by approximately 10 mm) and an increase in the summertime soil-moisture depletion rate (by approximately 10 mm/month). At the same time, an increase in both atmospheric near-surface specific and saturation specific humidity is projected, resulting in an increase in relative humidity across the southern por
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Climate, American Meteorological Society
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010

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