Androgen metabolites impact CSF amines and axonal serotonin via MAO-A and -B in male macaques.

C L Bethea, K Phu, A Kim, Arubala Reddy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A number of studies have shown that mutations or deletions of the monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) gene cause elevated CNS serotonin and elevated impulsive aggression in humans and animal models. In addition, low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5HIAA) has been documented in a limited number of violent criminal populations and in macaques that exhibit impulsive aggression. To reconcile these different analyses, we hypothesized that CSF 5HIAA reflected degradation of serotonin by the activity of MAO-A; and that low MAO-A activity would result in lower CSF 5HIAA, but overall higher serotonin in the CNS. To test this hypothesis, male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated, rested for 5-7months, and then treated for 3months with [1] placebo, [2] testosterone (T), [3] dihydrotestosterone (DHT; non-aromatizable androgen) and 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD) (steroidal aromatase inhibitor), or [4] flutamide (FLUT; androgen antagonist) and ATD (n=5/group). The
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)576-89
JournalNeuroscience
StatePublished - Jul 2015

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