An investigation of the effects of different types of activities during pauses in a segmented instructional animation

Jongpil Cheon, Sungwon Chung, Steven M. Crooks, Jaeki Song, Jeakyeong Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Since the complex and transient information in instructional animations requires more cognitive resources, the segmenting principle has been proposed to reduce cognitive overload by providing smaller chunks with pauses between segments. This study examined the effects of different types of activities during pauses in a segmented animation. Four groups were asked to do different tasks in system-controlled pauses after each segment of an instructional animation: passive pauses (i.e., no-reflection vs. reflection), and active pauses (i.e., free-recall vs. short-answer). The results showed that active pause with free-recall group outperformed the two passive pause groups on both recall and transfer tests. However, no significant differences in mental effort for the instruction or the tests were found. The findings of this study provide valuable implications for effective ways of using pauses between segments in instructional animations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)296-306
Number of pages11
JournalEducational Technology and Society
Volume17
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Active pauses
  • Instructional animation
  • Pauses in segments
  • Segmenting principle

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