Ammonium perchlorate disruption of thyroid function in natural amphibian populations: Assessment and potential impact

James A. Carr, Lina J. Urquidi, Wanda L. Goleman, Fang Hu, Philip N. Smith, Christopher W. Theodorakis

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined indices of thyroid development in tadpoles from ammonium perchlorate (AP)-exposed sites. Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) tadpoles collected from a reference site exhibited normal developmental features, with many completing metamorphoses. In contrast, tadpoles collected from the AP contaminated site exhibited a 5-fold lower hindlimb/snout-vent length ratio than tadpoles from the reference site. The volume of the thyroid gland was 2.5-fold larger in the tadpoles from the reference site, presumably because they had progressed to late prometamorphosis and early metamorphic climax. Premetamorphic western chorus frog tadpoles (Pseudacris triseriata) inhabiting an ephemeral pond contaminated with AP exhibited gross morphological abnormalities of the thyroid including colloid depletion and follicle cell hypertrophy. We conclude that tadpoles exposed to AP-contaminated pond water early in larval life exhibit delayed development of thyroid-hormone sensitive structures. Additionally, there are abnormalities in the developing thyroid gland that seem to depend upon the window of AP exposure. The potential impact of thyroid disruption on development and reproduction in amphibian populations will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-142
Number of pages13
JournalASTM Special Technical Publication
Issue number1443
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
EventMultiple Stressor Effects in Relation to Declining Amphibian Populations - Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Duration: Apr 16 2002Apr 17 2002

Keywords

  • Amphibian
  • Metamorphosis
  • Perchlorate
  • Thyroid

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