Alternative Herbicides for the Management of Clethodim-Resistant Rigid Ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) in Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) in Southern Australia

Rupinder Kaur Saini, Samuel G.L. Kleemann, Christopher Preston, Gurjeet S. Gill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two field experiments were conducted during 2012 and 2013 at Roseworthy, South Australia to identify effective herbicide options for the management of clethodim-resistant rigid ryegrass in faba bean. Dose-response experiments confirmed resistance in both field populations (B3, 2012 and E2, 2013) to clethodim and butroxydim. Sequencing of the target site of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase gene in both populations identified an aspartate-2078-glycine mutation. Although resistance of B3 and E2 populations to clethodim was similar (16.5- and 21.4-fold more resistant than the susceptible control SLR4), the B3 population was much more resistant to butroxydim (7.13-fold) than E2 (2.24-fold). Addition of butroxydim to clethodim reduced rigid ryegrass plant density 60 to 80% and seed production 71 to 88% compared with the standard grower practice of simazine PPI plus clethodim POST. Clethodim + butroxydim combination had the highest grain yield of faba bean (980 to 2,400 kg ha-1). Although propyzamide and pyroxasulfone plus triallate PPI provided the next highest levels of rigid ryegrass control (< 60%), these treatments were more variable and unable to reduce seed production (6,354 to 13,570 seeds m-2) to levels acceptable for continuous cropping systems. Nomenclature: Clethodim; rigid ryegrass, Lolium rigidum Gaudin; faba bean, Vicia faba L.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)578-586
Number of pages9
JournalWeed Technology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Keywords

  • Herbicide strategies
  • PPI herbicides
  • target site mutation
  • weed control

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