Age-related differences in hip flexion maximal and rapid strength and rectus femoris muscle size and composition

Ahalee C. Farrow, Ty B. Palmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the effects of age on hip flexion maximal and rapid strength and rectus femoris (RF) muscle size and composition in men. Fifteen young (25 [3] y) and 15 older (73 [4] y) men performed isometric hip flexion contractions to examine peak torque and absolute and normalized rate of torque development (RTD) at time intervals of 0 to 100 and 100 to 200 milliseconds. Ultrasonography was used to examine RF muscle cross-sectional area and echo intensity. Peak torque, absolute RTD at 0 to 100 milliseconds, and absolute and normalized RTD at 100 to 200 milliseconds were significantly lower (P = .004-.045) in the old compared with the young men. The older men exhibited lower cross-sectional area (P = .015) and higher echo intensity (P = .007) than the young men. Moreover, there were positive relationships between cross-sectional area and absolute RTD at 0 to 100 milliseconds (r = .400) and absolute RTD at 100 to 200 milliseconds (r = .450) and negative relationships between echo intensity and absolute RTD at 100 to 200 milliseconds (r = -.457) and normalized RTD at 100 to 200 milliseconds (r = -.373). These findings indicate that hip flexion maximal and rapid strength and RF muscle size and composition decrease in old age. The relationships observed between ultrasound-derived RF parameters and measurements of RTD suggest that these age-related declines in muscle size and composition may be relevant to hip flexion rapid torque production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)311-319
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Biomechanics
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Contraction
  • Isometric
  • Peak torque
  • Rate of torque development
  • Ultrasound

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