African Americans, U.S. poverty, and international law: An afrocentric cultural revolution

Valerie Borum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Statistical rates of poverty among African Americans often hide the cultural and historical nature of their intended consequences. Unfavorable outcomes for social change can occur when viewing poverty among African Americans in isolation from their unique historical and cultural experiences and U.S. social, political, and capitalistic influences. While pressures to subordinate African Americans continue, African Americans also exert pressure (e.g., social movements) as human agents in their efforts toward self-determination. In order to understand and/or ameliorate poverty in the US, policy makers, researchers, and educators must first deal with the cultural hegemony undergirding it.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-120
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

Keywords

  • African American
  • Afrocentricity
  • Culture
  • International law
  • Poverty

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