Action-control beliefs and behaviors as predictors of change in adjustment across the transition to middle school

Marie Vanlede, Todd D. Little, Noel A. Card

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined longitudinal changes in young adolescents ( N =368) action-control beliefs, coping behaviors, and adjustment (i.e., positive and negative affect, depression, aggression) across the transition from elementary school to middle school. Results indicated greater inter-individual instability in adjustment during this transition than during the previous school year. Using ordinary least-squares (OLS) growth models to extract intra-individual change scores for each variable (i.e., slopes and intercepts), we conducted a series of stepwise regressions to determine which features of control beliefs and coping behaviors best predicted changes in adjustment across the transition to middle school. We found that negative coping behaviors (i.e., antisocial coping) consistently predicted negative changes in the adjustment variables (e.g., greater depression, more aggression), whereas positive beliefs and behaviors did not consistently predict changes in the adjustment variables.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-127
Number of pages17
JournalAnxiety, Stress and Coping
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

Keywords

  • Action-control behaviors
  • Action-control beliefs
  • Adjustment
  • Coping
  • Longitudinal growth modeling
  • Middle school transition

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