Acquisition speed with targets on the edge of the screen: An application of Fitts' law to commonly used Web browser controls

J. Shawn Farris, Keith S. Jones, Brent A. Anders

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

According to Fitts' law, the time to acquire a target can be reduced by either reducing the target's distance or increasing its size. Tognazzini (1999) proposed that the time to acquire a target on graphical user interfaces could be reduced further by moving targets to the edge of the screen (i.e., edge targets). Two studies tested these predictions with a web browser interface's back-button (Experiment 1) and scroll bar (Experiment 2). Results support the aforementioned hypotheses. Edge targets were always faster to acquire than targets placed one pixel from the edge of the screen. However, within the constraints of the current studies, this speed advantage is maximal at approximately 393 ms for target heights ≥ 2.00 cm and target distances ≥ 11.75 cm. Design recommendations and a cost/benefit analysis are given.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1205-1209
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
StatePublished - 2001
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 45th Annual Meeting - Minneapolis/St.Paul, MN, United States
Duration: Oct 8 2001Oct 12 2001

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