A short, attribution theory-based video intervention does not reduce weight bias in a nationally representative sample of registered dietitians: a randomized trial

Nadeeja N. Wijayatunga, Dylan Bailey, Seth S. Klobodu, John A. Dawson, Katie Knight, Emily J. Dhurandhar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background/objectives: Weight bias among registered dietitians (RDs) is a concern and effective interventions to reduce weight bias are sparse. Our objective was to determine if a short, attribution theory-based online video intervention would reduce weight bias in RDs. Subjects/methods: Dietitians from a nationally representative sample were recruited for a randomized, parallel-arm study with online surveys at pre-, post-intervention and 1-month follow-up. One hundred and forty-seven RDs who watched one of three videos embedded in an online survey from June to August 2019 were considered for the analysis. RDs were randomized to watch either the intervention, positive control, or negative control video. The primary outcome was the change in the “blame” component of the Anti-Fat Attitude Test (AFAT) from pre-to immediate post-intervention. Differences in changes in AFAT and Implicit Association Test (IAT) scores across treatment groups were assessed via linear models; multiple imputation were performed for missing data. Results: Baseline demographics, AFAT and IAT scores of the 147 participants who watched a video were not significantly different between the study groups (p > 0.05). The intervention group’s AFAT-blame score reduced by an average of 0.05 between pre- and immediate post-intervention but was not statistically significant (p = 0.76, confidence intervals (CI) = −0.40, 0.30). Furthermore, there were no significant changes for AFAT-social, AFAT-physical subscores, and IAT within or between groups between pre- and immediate post-intervention (p > 0.05). Due to high attrition rates, the changes at 1-month follow-up are not reported. Conclusions: This study was the first to explore the effectiveness of an online video intervention to reduce weight bias in RDs. This study was unable to detect a significant impact of a short, attribution theory-based video intervention on weight bias in practicing RDs and future larger studies are needed to confirm our findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)787-794
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

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