A randomized clinical trial evaluating the effect of an oral calcium bolus supplementation strategy in postpartum jersey cows on mastitis, culling, milk production, and reproductive performance

Paulo R. Menta, Leticia Fernandes, Diego Poit, Maria Luiza Celestino, Vinicius S. Machado, Rafael C. Neves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of a postpartum oral calcium supplementation strategy in multiparous Jersey cows on (1) the odds of clinical mastitis in the first 60 days in milk (DIM); (2) the odds of culling up to 60 DIM; (3) the risk of pregnancy in the first 150 DIM; (4) milk production in the first 15 weeks of lactation. A randomized clinical trial was performed in a dairy herd located in west Texas, United States. A total of 809 cows were used in the final analyses. Overall, postpartum oral calcium supplementation did not influence milk production, reproductive performance, or culling. Among second parity cows, oral calcium supplementation tended to decrease the odds of clinical mastitis in the first 60 DIM compared to controls; however, no differences were observed for cows in parities three and greater. To date, data evaluating the effect of postpartum oral calcium supplementation in multiparous Jersey cows are limited. In our study, oral calcium supplementation tended to reduce clinical mastitis in second parity cows. No positive benefits based on the reduction of culling, and improvement of milk production and reproductive performance were evident for the herd included in this study.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3361
JournalAnimals
Volume11
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Culling
  • Dairy cow
  • Hypocalcemia
  • Jersey
  • Mastitis
  • Milk production
  • Oral calcium bolus
  • Reproduction

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