A Politics of Erasure: The Intersection of Race and Color-Blind Rhetoric in Supreme Court Opinions

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The United States has a long and well documented history of racial discrimination in its legal documents and practices. From enslaving a group of people (including denying them personhood and political enfranchisement) to discriminating practices in social interactions (including segregation or misogyny), the instances of institutional discrimination abound. Many persons like to believe that institutional racism no longer exists within the United States governmental system. All persons are granted equal protection under the law by our constitutional document, even if the institutional protection of equality does not equate to material reality. Critical race scholars reject this claim. Critical race scholars maintain that the metaphoric framework of justice as being “color-blind” in actually perpetuates systemic racism. This paper explores the ways in which legal opinions have constructed blacks rhetorically as “other.” Legal opinions have shifted the location of blacks within the cons
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationA Politics of Erasure: The Intersection of Race and Color-Blind Rhetoric in Supreme Court Opinions
PublisherNational Communication Association
Pages289-295
StatePublished - 2010

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    Langford, C. (2010). A Politics of Erasure: The Intersection of Race and Color-Blind Rhetoric in Supreme Court Opinions. In A Politics of Erasure: The Intersection of Race and Color-Blind Rhetoric in Supreme Court Opinions (pp. 289-295). National Communication Association.