A comparison of successful and unsuccessful strategies in individual sight-singing preparation and performance

Janice N. Killian, Michele L. Henry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

High school singers (N = 198) individually sang two melodies from notation, with and without a 30-second practice opportunity. Overall accuracy scores were significantly higher with preparation time. The less accurate singers, however, did not benefit from practice time. Analysis of videoed tests indicated that high scorers tonicized (vocally established the key), used, hand signs, sang out loud during practice, physically kept the beat, and finished practicing the melody within 30 seconds significantly more frequently than did low scorers during practice. Similar strategies were used during performance, with the addition of tonicizing before singing. Sightsinging system used made no significant difference. Characteristics appearing significantly more often among high scorers included: region/state choir, private voice or piano lessons, playing an instrument, membership in instrumental ensemble, sightsinging individually outside class, and director giving individual sight-singing tests. Results are discussed in terms of strategies for teaching individual sightsinging and recommended areas of future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-65
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Research in Music Education
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

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