A cognitive neuroscience perspective on political knowledge, misinformation, and memory for “facts”

Jason C. Coronel, Erik P. Bucy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Determining the accuracy, amount, and types of political information citizens remember is a central concern in public opinion and political communication research. This chapter argues that adopting a cognitive neuroscience perspective on memory can advance our understanding of how citizens make sense of the political world. To best illustrate how a cognitive neuroscience view of memory can improve research in political communication, examples from two important domains are given: political learning and knowledge, and processing misinformation. Ultimately, concepts and methods from neuroscience can inform assessments about the capacity of citizens to meet the challenges of democratic life.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Handbook of Communication Science and Biology
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages144-156
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781351235570
ISBN (Print)9780815376712
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

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