"A Case Study of the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program at Texas Tech University; Best Practices for an Integrated Arts Curriculum"

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In 1972, faculty members in the arts at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas USA designed an innovative PhD in Fine Arts degree program in which doctoral students in music, theatre and visual arts embrace core study in all three disciplines, yet maintain a focus on established studies in one particular area of specialization. Students participate in an interdisciplinary curriculum, enrolling in core courses in philosophy (aesthetics), visual arts, theatre and music as well as traditional coursework in their various specialized arts fields. Thirty-eight years later, this unique degree offering has had hundreds of graduates, and it is now possible to examine the impact of this program as an example of best practice in interdisciplinary curricula in the arts. The purpose of this presentation will be to examine the history of this unique degree offering, to specify the coursework pursued by current participants, and to explore the philosophical underpinnings of the program. Additio
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication"A Case Study of the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program at Texas Tech University; Best Practices for an Integrated Arts Curriculum"
PublisherAthens Institute for Education and Research
Pages341-352
Volume1
StatePublished - 2012

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  • Cite this

    Killian, J., Donahue, L., & Edwards, C. (2012). "A Case Study of the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program at Texas Tech University; Best Practices for an Integrated Arts Curriculum". In "A Case Study of the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program at Texas Tech University; Best Practices for an Integrated Arts Curriculum" (Vol. 1, pp. 341-352). Athens Institute for Education and Research.